/page/2
LCC Litho Print room.

LCC Litho Print room.

Second meeting with Tony

On my second meeting with Tony, Sabrina and I were able to present the (almost) final page designs and order. He was able to give us more detailed information, saying that we need to submit these as single page PDFs to ‘Jim’ in W107 and he can print them digitally. I had a look at the paper he had on offer and 100 gsm (out of 30, 100 and 300) seems best, the finish available is adequate. We should see him early next week, he advises.

Tony wanted to see the cover design for tomorrow, so that he knows what he is working with, and can advise us on where to get the plates made for the litho printing. This will have to be done outside uni.

He also advised us to consider the type of binding we will use, which I will provide some research on but I think side stitch may be the way to go as perfect binding is for a thicker publication really.

First meeting With Tony

When I visited Tony in the printing workshop he was very helpful. He advised, however, that we only print the cover using the litho method because of time and money. He also said that it would only be worthwhile to print a fair number of copies in this method, as otherwise it might as well be done digitally (would be cheaper). So we probably need around 30 copies of our publication. When we have our final cover design we hand this in as a PDF, with bleed and 5mm for the spine, given our publication size is A5.

Additional stories (First Edit)

1# You see that rather butch-looking tough guy? Between you and me, he’s actually undergoing therapy for claustrophobia. This journey is a big step in his recovery, and look, isn’t he doing well? Barely a bead of sweat! His greatest fear, however, is sleeping bags. It may still be a while before he tackles that one.

2# There’s a young man over there with a little bit of stubble. He is actually on his way home from a six month stint in the navy, and he can’t wait to see his child-hood sweetheart again. He has something extra to look forward to as well; the chance to see his daughter for the first time. You can be sure he’s going to savour the next six months with his new family before he’s back on deck again, a picture of them both in his wallet.

3# Now here’s something really exciting! On this very tube carriage there is a secret detective following a suspected Russian spy. I’m really not at liberty to reveal even the spy’s gender, but take a look around. I bet it will be hard to spot them, or at least it should be if they’re good at their job. It might not be so smart to start looking for the Russian spy though, wouldn’t want to get involved in all that mess, would you?

Expert Interview Transcript.

What is the main appeal of Bodleian Library?

The main appeal is really what we saw outside… that it was for Oxford academics… In other words, people can come here and apply to become a reader even if you’re not a university member. If you can document that you actually have a very good reason why you need to use the library, either for a book or for a doctorate or whatever, or lecture series, then people from all over the world come here to use this fantastic resource of rather rare books. Also as I said to you earlier, what we call modern papers are things that are for instance correspondents, diaries, from more recent times. So there is a lot of information that you can’t get from anywhere else, which is held here.

Even on the internet?

Even on the internet. You might be able to see some, for instance there might be… from the Frankenstein manuscript of Mary Shelley, I think that you probably would be able to find a couple of pages or so, showing a scan of… and these were just loose sheets where you can see what she wrote. And then Percy Shelley came in with his clever clogs comments, and rude things! [Laughs] It’s quite interesting to see. So that, in other words, the attraction here is that this is quite a unique collection.

Do you find that there are more visitors to the library now, when digital books are popular, or were there more when they weren’t?

I don’t know that that has changed that much… yes, because it’s quite a unique collection.

How would you say that this library, other than being unique and having things that you can’t find anywhere else is different from just a local library?

All these manuscripts I talked about. I mean it goes back to papyrus, to sort of charred remains of papyrus script from Pompeii and Herculaneum. We’re talking about very unusual things.

So this library then is very different from the average library we come across?

Yes, and of course Oxford is full of other libraries. The colleges have their own libraries, departments have libraries and so this is the ‘old’ library, this is where you read the stuff which you can’t get anywhere else.

So what do you think is the future of libraries, or this library in particular?

Well I think that what we see, is with one of the benefactors I didn’t point out to you upstairs was the Millan Foundation in America, and they have given money that started up Oxford digital library. And also another project which you can find, where I said about the medieval images, and that means that you… all over the world anybody can access this for free, just go into Bodleian Library and look for these sort of key words you’ll be able to find… And the Google Project of course, they as well were scanning a whole lot of old books, of printed books and so, the future is I think that it will probably be even more used, for historical reasons.

Would you say that people come to this library mostly for non-fiction… there’s not really much fiction here is there?

Well… yes….

Well people come for academic reasons, is that correct? Not just to enjoy reading fiction?

Yes, yes, you can also see people here enjoying reading. [Laughs] And you have the poet, uh, whats his name again… There are local writers who want to use this as a sort of study to visit their own work in the upper reading room, and you’re very lucky to find anything on open shelves that you’re looking for, you have to order a book. And then it depends on where it’s housed, how long it takes to come before you can use it. In the old days I remember it would take two hours, so you would go in and write down all your order slips. Now of course you can do it online, and you can do it remotely so the books are ready for you when you come in. And you’re ready to start working.

So you would say there’s more fiction that non-fiction?

[Laughs] Yeah I mean English literature, yes. When it comes to foreign books, I mean say books in French, they would probably be housed in the Taylorian institute library which is where the modern languages are. So you have to think of the campus being all over town.

How do you categorise the books that you say you have to order?

I think… they are categorised by, y’know for instance, English literature would have ‘Eng Lit’ on the shelf mark. And then you would have part of the Bodleian Library is the Radcliffe Science Library which is further up the road. So there you would have books on natural sciences for instance. So it’s all very complicated, it’s a big web really! [laughs]

Can I ask what your name is?

Its Rigmor Batsvik… you can probably google me.

Notes from Pre Press, Production & Artwork Preperation For Print Workshop

  • You can actually print on any flat surface - glass, fabric, metal, etc. Print is far more than ink on paper.
  • A ‘substrate’ is what you print on.
  • A sheet printed on both sides is more likely to be held, but it can be tricky to get alignment.
  • The different ways you fold provide different design solutions and may change the way you print.
  • The way you fold also creates narrative.
  • 'Pagination' = sequential, how we would see the pages.
  • It is important to make mock-ups, to feel the thickness of the number of pages you have and the types of paper. 
  • All pages for print should be in multiples of four.
  • In commercial printing they usually print 16 pages at a time, some are upside down.
  • Trimming is usually required, don’t put precise things next to the edge of the page.
  • Its the printers job to imposition.
  • Do flat plans for organisation, make them thumbnails.
  • Don’t waste paper by printing on paper that is too big.
  • Use Indeisgn for multiple page designs.
  • Margin space is not dictatorial. 
  • Bleed is important if you print to the edge.
  • (Indesign) You can have non-symmetrical columns, it can aid the design. You can also make guidelines with the mouse.
  • It useful to make an initial ‘dummy layout’.
  • When you finish, you need to preview your document without the guidelines. (Press W)
  • Whenever possible get someone to proof-read.
  • RGB is additive, it gets lighter with more colour. CMYK on the other hand gets darker with more colour.
  • Colour sensitivity is only important in print, not screen.
  • 300 dpi is usually used in print for images, there is usually no point in going into 800 dpi for example.
  • It is not advised to scan from printed material - the original would have been printed in dots, and you’re scanning in dots so they will clash.
  • Ask printers whether they prefer CMYK or RGB. Work closely with your printers.
  • Spot colour = specifically made ink (used in branding, coco-cola red for example)
  • If you want to print something over something else you use a knock-out, so that usually the colour will come out correctly. Or you can print over without a knock-out to create another colour where the inks mix.
  • Duotone is usually a colour plus black.
  • Most printers require PDF files to print. (In photoshop/ illustrator go to ‘save as’, in Indesign go to ‘export’)
  • Always keep the original files and bring back-ups with you. You should have at least 3 copies of everything.
  • Laser printers usually print single sided.
  • Inkjets run on rolls so you can print bigger.
  • Booklet printers can print both sides, they can also staple.
  • Offset Litho is where the image starts positive, whereas in screen printing etc the image starts negative.
  • Offset Litho is cheaper for mass printing than for odd ones and twos.
  • Make a separate document for covers, they should be a different size and stock.

Photographs I took from our trip to the Bodleian Library in Oxford.

LCC Litho Print room.

LCC Litho Print room.

Second meeting with Tony

On my second meeting with Tony, Sabrina and I were able to present the (almost) final page designs and order. He was able to give us more detailed information, saying that we need to submit these as single page PDFs to ‘Jim’ in W107 and he can print them digitally. I had a look at the paper he had on offer and 100 gsm (out of 30, 100 and 300) seems best, the finish available is adequate. We should see him early next week, he advises.

Tony wanted to see the cover design for tomorrow, so that he knows what he is working with, and can advise us on where to get the plates made for the litho printing. This will have to be done outside uni.

He also advised us to consider the type of binding we will use, which I will provide some research on but I think side stitch may be the way to go as perfect binding is for a thicker publication really.

First meeting With Tony

When I visited Tony in the printing workshop he was very helpful. He advised, however, that we only print the cover using the litho method because of time and money. He also said that it would only be worthwhile to print a fair number of copies in this method, as otherwise it might as well be done digitally (would be cheaper). So we probably need around 30 copies of our publication. When we have our final cover design we hand this in as a PDF, with bleed and 5mm for the spine, given our publication size is A5.

Additional stories (First Edit)

1# You see that rather butch-looking tough guy? Between you and me, he’s actually undergoing therapy for claustrophobia. This journey is a big step in his recovery, and look, isn’t he doing well? Barely a bead of sweat! His greatest fear, however, is sleeping bags. It may still be a while before he tackles that one.

2# There’s a young man over there with a little bit of stubble. He is actually on his way home from a six month stint in the navy, and he can’t wait to see his child-hood sweetheart again. He has something extra to look forward to as well; the chance to see his daughter for the first time. You can be sure he’s going to savour the next six months with his new family before he’s back on deck again, a picture of them both in his wallet.

3# Now here’s something really exciting! On this very tube carriage there is a secret detective following a suspected Russian spy. I’m really not at liberty to reveal even the spy’s gender, but take a look around. I bet it will be hard to spot them, or at least it should be if they’re good at their job. It might not be so smart to start looking for the Russian spy though, wouldn’t want to get involved in all that mess, would you?

Expert Interview Transcript.

What is the main appeal of Bodleian Library?

The main appeal is really what we saw outside… that it was for Oxford academics… In other words, people can come here and apply to become a reader even if you’re not a university member. If you can document that you actually have a very good reason why you need to use the library, either for a book or for a doctorate or whatever, or lecture series, then people from all over the world come here to use this fantastic resource of rather rare books. Also as I said to you earlier, what we call modern papers are things that are for instance correspondents, diaries, from more recent times. So there is a lot of information that you can’t get from anywhere else, which is held here.

Even on the internet?

Even on the internet. You might be able to see some, for instance there might be… from the Frankenstein manuscript of Mary Shelley, I think that you probably would be able to find a couple of pages or so, showing a scan of… and these were just loose sheets where you can see what she wrote. And then Percy Shelley came in with his clever clogs comments, and rude things! [Laughs] It’s quite interesting to see. So that, in other words, the attraction here is that this is quite a unique collection.

Do you find that there are more visitors to the library now, when digital books are popular, or were there more when they weren’t?

I don’t know that that has changed that much… yes, because it’s quite a unique collection.

How would you say that this library, other than being unique and having things that you can’t find anywhere else is different from just a local library?

All these manuscripts I talked about. I mean it goes back to papyrus, to sort of charred remains of papyrus script from Pompeii and Herculaneum. We’re talking about very unusual things.

So this library then is very different from the average library we come across?

Yes, and of course Oxford is full of other libraries. The colleges have their own libraries, departments have libraries and so this is the ‘old’ library, this is where you read the stuff which you can’t get anywhere else.

So what do you think is the future of libraries, or this library in particular?

Well I think that what we see, is with one of the benefactors I didn’t point out to you upstairs was the Millan Foundation in America, and they have given money that started up Oxford digital library. And also another project which you can find, where I said about the medieval images, and that means that you… all over the world anybody can access this for free, just go into Bodleian Library and look for these sort of key words you’ll be able to find… And the Google Project of course, they as well were scanning a whole lot of old books, of printed books and so, the future is I think that it will probably be even more used, for historical reasons.

Would you say that people come to this library mostly for non-fiction… there’s not really much fiction here is there?

Well… yes….

Well people come for academic reasons, is that correct? Not just to enjoy reading fiction?

Yes, yes, you can also see people here enjoying reading. [Laughs] And you have the poet, uh, whats his name again… There are local writers who want to use this as a sort of study to visit their own work in the upper reading room, and you’re very lucky to find anything on open shelves that you’re looking for, you have to order a book. And then it depends on where it’s housed, how long it takes to come before you can use it. In the old days I remember it would take two hours, so you would go in and write down all your order slips. Now of course you can do it online, and you can do it remotely so the books are ready for you when you come in. And you’re ready to start working.

So you would say there’s more fiction that non-fiction?

[Laughs] Yeah I mean English literature, yes. When it comes to foreign books, I mean say books in French, they would probably be housed in the Taylorian institute library which is where the modern languages are. So you have to think of the campus being all over town.

How do you categorise the books that you say you have to order?

I think… they are categorised by, y’know for instance, English literature would have ‘Eng Lit’ on the shelf mark. And then you would have part of the Bodleian Library is the Radcliffe Science Library which is further up the road. So there you would have books on natural sciences for instance. So it’s all very complicated, it’s a big web really! [laughs]

Can I ask what your name is?

Its Rigmor Batsvik… you can probably google me.

Notes from Pre Press, Production & Artwork Preperation For Print Workshop

  • You can actually print on any flat surface - glass, fabric, metal, etc. Print is far more than ink on paper.
  • A ‘substrate’ is what you print on.
  • A sheet printed on both sides is more likely to be held, but it can be tricky to get alignment.
  • The different ways you fold provide different design solutions and may change the way you print.
  • The way you fold also creates narrative.
  • 'Pagination' = sequential, how we would see the pages.
  • It is important to make mock-ups, to feel the thickness of the number of pages you have and the types of paper. 
  • All pages for print should be in multiples of four.
  • In commercial printing they usually print 16 pages at a time, some are upside down.
  • Trimming is usually required, don’t put precise things next to the edge of the page.
  • Its the printers job to imposition.
  • Do flat plans for organisation, make them thumbnails.
  • Don’t waste paper by printing on paper that is too big.
  • Use Indeisgn for multiple page designs.
  • Margin space is not dictatorial. 
  • Bleed is important if you print to the edge.
  • (Indesign) You can have non-symmetrical columns, it can aid the design. You can also make guidelines with the mouse.
  • It useful to make an initial ‘dummy layout’.
  • When you finish, you need to preview your document without the guidelines. (Press W)
  • Whenever possible get someone to proof-read.
  • RGB is additive, it gets lighter with more colour. CMYK on the other hand gets darker with more colour.
  • Colour sensitivity is only important in print, not screen.
  • 300 dpi is usually used in print for images, there is usually no point in going into 800 dpi for example.
  • It is not advised to scan from printed material - the original would have been printed in dots, and you’re scanning in dots so they will clash.
  • Ask printers whether they prefer CMYK or RGB. Work closely with your printers.
  • Spot colour = specifically made ink (used in branding, coco-cola red for example)
  • If you want to print something over something else you use a knock-out, so that usually the colour will come out correctly. Or you can print over without a knock-out to create another colour where the inks mix.
  • Duotone is usually a colour plus black.
  • Most printers require PDF files to print. (In photoshop/ illustrator go to ‘save as’, in Indesign go to ‘export’)
  • Always keep the original files and bring back-ups with you. You should have at least 3 copies of everything.
  • Laser printers usually print single sided.
  • Inkjets run on rolls so you can print bigger.
  • Booklet printers can print both sides, they can also staple.
  • Offset Litho is where the image starts positive, whereas in screen printing etc the image starts negative.
  • Offset Litho is cheaper for mass printing than for odd ones and twos.
  • Make a separate document for covers, they should be a different size and stock.

Photographs I took from our trip to the Bodleian Library in Oxford.

(via sarnain)

Second meeting with Tony
First meeting With Tony
Additional stories (First Edit)
Expert Interview Transcript.
Notes from Pre Press, Production & Artwork Preperation For Print Workshop

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